Quality Photo Guide

How big does my photo need to be?

Computers 'think' in terms of pixels to define the resolution of an image. We refer to these as DPI, or "dots per inch." Part of our process requires that we enlarge your image to the size of the puzzle you've selected. To do this while maintaining acceptable clarity, the image needs to be a high enough resolution before we enlarge it.

A rule of thumb is that the bigger the original image, the better the resulting puzzle. To display the image on your computer screen, we only need 72dpi. For printing, we have better results with at least 150dpi, preferably 300 dpi.

What does a 'file size' mean?

A file size is the number of pixels in your image. For some guidelines, you can use the following chart:

size,dim,pix.jpg

What data formats can be used? 

We accept JPEGS, GIFS or PNGS. We do not accept CMYK files.

What resolution is required?

We have a 5-star rating system that will allow you to see the quality of your photo. If your photo receives a one or two star rating, your picture will most likely turn out blurry and you will not be happy. 

5 stars= excellent quality

4 stars=great quality

3 stars=average quality

2 stars=moderate quality. Your photo will turn out blurry. Please select a larger file size. 

1 star=poor quality. Your puzzle will turn out blurry. Please select a larger file size.

For more specific details about our 5-star rating system, please click here

Puzzle Quality Tips x

Why am I Getting a Low Quality Score?

When it comes to printing, we need a high quality photo for the best results. The larger the image, the better the results are going to be. If you're uploading a photo we recommend sending us the largest version of the photo you have. Here's some quick tips that may help you.

  • File sizes less than 500k are likely going to be too small of a photo.
  • Try grabbing images directly from your camera, do not re-size them. 
  • For smaller puzzles (like our 16, 100, 250, 500), a great camera setting is 6MP or 3000x2000 pixels
  • For larger puzzles (like our 300, 1000, 1500 piece) a good camera setting would be 10MP or 5000x3600 pixels